On Writing

Truth stems not from one plant that gets constantly watered, but from multiple plants that grow simultaneously, entangling into the ultimate truth.

Although I have always had an insatiable hunger for books, I have only recently developed a desire to put my own thoughts down on paper. Something about writing was too immutable, too slow, and too constraining for my leaping thoughts.

Supposedly some people think in words and images. I don’t. I think with ideas. My thoughts are a holistic web, and writing is like constraining the web into a line that is terribly incomplete. Writing is linear, which is not how my thought process works. When writing, you are forced to pick a position and go from there. But that’s not how reality should be assembled. Rather, truth stems not from one plant that gets constantly watered, but from multiple plants that grow simultaneously, entangling into the ultimate truth.

Despite all of the shortcomings of writing, I still love it. Writing is powerful. Words are the vessels of ideas, and ideas drive action. Without books and the written language, our society would be far less advanced than it is today. We would have less knowledge of the past, which would hinder our growth in the present and future. After all, what are ideas without communication, and what is history without the written language?

The books we write containing our knowledge and imagination will never be infinite, but they’re the largest finite product we can ever make. It would be nice, though, to have ways to communicate and record information without writing and instead be able to record our thoughts and communicate through telepathy. Imagine how we could lessen the number of miscommunications and create more direct pathways for ideas. However, even if we could somehow easily communicate telepathically in the future, writing will forever be an integral part of us. Writing is a hindrance, yet it is vital for communication, expression, and expansion of our knowledge.

Advertisements